Is periodontal/gum disease contagious?

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Research has shown that periodontal/gum disease is caused by the inflammatory reaction to bacteria under the gums, so periodontal disease technically may not be contagious. However, the bacteria that cause the inflammatory reaction can be spread through saliva. This means that if one of your family members has periodontal disease, it’s a good idea to avoid contact with their saliva by not sharing eating utensils or oral health equipment. If you notice that your spouse or a family member has the warning signs of a possible periodontal problem (bleeding, red and swollen gums, or bad breath) you may want to suggest that they see a dentist or periodontist for an exam. It may help to protect the oral health of everyone in the family. (APP)
Dr. Elizabeth Dimovski and Associates – We Protect Your Smile!
Brampton Dentists, Periodontist and Gum Specialist – 905-458-6620

FREE ORAL B RECHARGEABLE TOOTHBRUSH OR CREST WHITESTRIPS 3D

Book your complete exam, cleaning and complete your treatment by June 30th, 2015 and receive a FREE Oral B Rechargeable Toothbrush Or Crest Whitestrips 3D.

CALL TO BOOK YOUR APPOINTMENT TODAY 905-458-6620
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FREE ORAL B RECHARGEABLE TOOTHBRUSH OR CREST WHITESTRIPS 3D 

This promotion is while supplies last! Please Note: All Balances must be cleared to receive your Free Rechargeable Toothbrush or Crest Whitestrips 3D (Not valid with any other offer)

Dr. Elizabeth Dimovski & Associates – We Protect Your Smile!

www.dentist-in-brampton.com

905-458-6620

The affects of drugs and alcohol on your oral health!

Article by: Mira Budd

Depressed Woman, tobacco, ecstasy, marijuana, heroine, amphetamines, methamphetamines drugs, alcohol, replacement therapies,Are you using tobacco, ecstasy, marijuana, heroine, amphetamines, methamphetamines drugs, alcohol and replacement therapies? Below is a list of the drugs and their affect on your teeth and oral health.

Tobacco, Ecstasy, Amphetamines and Methamphetamines: These drugs can cause constriction of the capillaries in your gums affecting the attachment of the bone to the tissue of the teeth which may lead to tooth loss.

Marijuana, Ecstasy, Amphetamines, Methamphetamines, Heroin and Replacement Therapies: These drugs may decrease the production of saliva in your mouth causing dry mouth which will increase the risk of gum disease and tooth decay.

Ecstasy, Marijuana and Heroin: These drugs cause sugar cravings. Consumption of sweets and sugary drinks weaken the tooth enamel.

Alcohol: When drinking alcohol your mouth is exposed to increased levels of sugars and acids which can be damaging to your teeth. Excessive drinking may lead to vomiting which may lead to tooth erosion. It is also important to know that according to the Canadian Cancer Society, the risk of developing oral cancer increases with the amount of alcohol consumed. Drinking alcohol is the second major risk factor for developing oral cancer.

Dr. Elizabeth Dimovski & Associates – We Protect Your Smile!

www.dentist-in-brampton.com

Brampton Dentists 905-458-6620

Before you decorate your mouth for Christmas know the facts! Brampton Dentists

Tongue piercing, Oral Piercings, top dentist in brampton, brampton dental office, best dentist in brampton, tooth decay, tooth infection,

When it comes to decorating your mouth or tongue you should think twice and know the facts. When asked about oral piercings most dental professionals say no. The risks right after an oral piercing are same as any open wound, including pain, swelling, infection and scar tissue formation, but can be more serious when it involves the tongue.

Risks of oral piercing vary depending on the location of the oral piercing. Common placements of oral piercings are on the tongue, labret (the space between the lower lip and chin), lips, uvula or cheeks.

Piercings through the tongue or lip, or below the tongue, can cause tooth damage such as cracked or chipped teeth. Piercings through the floor of the mouth below the tongue or through the tongue have the highest risk of serious infection as they have the highest blood flow and are closest to the airway. Other risks include nerve, muscle or gum tissue damage. Piercings can also cause the gums to recede which may cause tooth decay and gum disease.

If after knowing all the facts you are still inclined in getting an oral piercing be sure to take precautions to avoid damage to your mouth and self. Below is a list of precautionary measures put out by the Ontario Dental Association, before and after oral piercings.

  • Check out the cleanliness of the place doing the piercing. Do they have an infection-control policy posted? A recent investigation by the Toronto Star and the Ryerson University School of Journalism found that half of the complaints filed against personal service settings in Toronto, such as tattoo and piercing parlours, involved items not being properly cleaned or sterilized.
  • Ensure that the practitioner performing the piercing is experienced and uses strict infection-control practices (an autoclave sterilizer, for example, for non-disposable equipment, and new needles and gloves) to avoid serious infections such as hepatitis B and C, and HIV. Ask for detailed after-care instructions.
  • Disinfect your oral jewelry regularly and brush the jewelry the same as you would your teeth.
  • If piercings are in close proximity to the teeth, make sure the ends, or even the entire stud, are made of plastic.
  • Try to avoid the tongue or the floor of the mouth for piercing because of its higher risk of infection.
  • Seek immediate medical or dental attention if you experience excessive bleeding, swelling or pain following a piercing, or if there is any evidence of infection (an odour or fluid from the piercing, for example).
  • Visit your dentist regularly so that he or she can closely monitor the piercing and any potential damage to teeth and gums.

Dr. Elizabeth Dimovski and Associated – We Protect Your Smile!

905-458-6620