Are you struggling with bad breath?

What you eat affects your breath. If you don’t brush and floss daily, particles of food can remain in the mouth, collecting bacteria, which can cause bad breath.

Breath mints and chewing gum are great temporary solutions to bad breath, but they can’t help you if your bad breath problem stems from something beyond the garlic and onions you had for lunch. Persistent bad breath or a bad taste in the mouth can also be one of the warning signs of gum disease; which is caused by plaque.

Your first line of defence against bad breath should be to make sure you brush two times a day for two minutes and floss once a day. You should also brush your tongue since most of the bacteria in the mouth that are responsible for bad breath hang out on the back of the tongue. If you still find your breath is offensive, talk to your dentist or physician. Your dentist can work with you to develop a treatment plan that minimizes odor. This might include scraping the plaque off your tongue or using a special antibacterial mouth-rinse.

If you already practice good oral hygiene and still don’t know what’s causing your bad breath, make an appointment to see your dentist. Regular checkups allow your dentist to detect any problems such as gum disease or dry mouth. Bad breath may be the sign of a medical disorder. Some diseases have symptoms related to bad breath. Sinus or lung infections, bronchitis, diabetes, and some liver or kidney diseases may be associated with bad breath. If your dentist determines that your mouth is healthy, you may be referred to your primary care physician.

Maintaining good oral hygiene, eliminating gum disease and scheduling regular professional cleanings are essential to reducing bad breath. Brush twice a day and clean between your teeth daily with floss. Brush your tongue, too. If you wear dentures, be sure to remove them at night and clean them thoroughly before replacing them the next morning.

For more information be sure to schedule an appointment with one of our dental professionals.

Dr. Elizabeth Dimovski and Associates – We Protect Your Smile!

905-458-6620

Dr, Dimovski Dental, Brampton Dental offices,
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Without an examination by your dentists early signs of oral cancer are difficult to detect.

Top Dentist in Brampton, Brampton Dental Offices, Dentists Brampton, Brampton Health, Dental info,What is Oral Cancer?

Oral cancer refers to all cancers of the oral cavity, which includes the following:

  • lips
  • tongue
  • teeth
  • gums (gingiva)
  • lining inside the lips and cheeks (labial mucosa and buccal mucosa)
  • floor of the mouth
  • roof of the mouth (palate)
  • the area behind the wisdom teeth

Most oral cancers are located on the sides of the tongue, floor of the mouth and lips.

Oral cancer starts in the cells of the mouth. Normally these cells are quite resistant to damage, but repeated injury from smoking, alcohol or even friction may cause sores or painful areas where cancer can start.

Symptoms

Oral cancer symptoms include:

  • a sore on the lip or in the mouth that does not heal
  • a lump on the lip or in the mouth or throat
  • a white or red patch on the gums, tongue or lining of the mouth
  • unusual bleeding, pain or numbness in the mouth
  • a sore throat that does not go away, or a feeling that something is caught in the throat
  • difficulty or pain with chewing or swallowing
  • swelling of the jaw that causes dentures to fit poorly or become uncomfortable
  • a change in the voice and/or pain in the ear


Your Dental Exam

Your dentist does more than protect and care for your teeth, gums and smile — your dentist can also help keep you healthy.As oral health experts, dentists are in a unique position to help in the early detection of many medical conditions, including cancer.Dentists are trained in medicine so they recognize the relationships between oral and overall health.
Most people see their dentist regularly, so your dentist is often the first health-care professional to have an opportunity to detect the many health conditions that affect your mouth. Many patients are not aware of the extent that a dental exam can play in disease prevention.Through the dental exam, your dentist can see if there are any abnormalities or changes in your mouth that might be indications of health problems, such as oral cancer or diabetes. At each visit, your dentist will conduct a medical history review and ask you about your current health.It’s important to answer these questions carefully. What you say can help your dentist alert you to potential health concerns that may require further investigation, diagnosis or treatment by a physician.

Without an examination by a dentist, most early signs of oral cancer are difficult to detect. If you notice a mouth sore or anything out of the ordinary that does not go away or heal after a couple of weeks, discuss it with your dentist.

Risk Factors

  • Smoking and chewing tobaccoparticularly if combined with heavy alcohol consumption
  • Heavy alcohol consumptionparticularly if combined with smoking
  • Excessive sun exposure particularly to the lip
  • Age people over the age of 40 have a higher risk of developing oral cancer
  • Gender men are more susceptible than women to developing oral cancer. In the past, men had a 6:1 ratio of incidence of oral cancer compared to women. However; this ratio is narrowing and is now closer to a 2:1 ratio
  • HPV more research is emerging that connects human papillomavirus infection — especially HPV-16 — with oral cancers
  • A diet low in fruits and vegetables fruit and vegetables have a protective factor that is believed to reduce the risk for oral cancers

Prevention

  • See a dental professional for a regular dental exam
  • Quitting (or reducing) your tobacco and alcohol use lowers your risk of developing oral cancer
  • When you are outside and exposed to the sun, use lip balm with UV protection and wear a hat
  • Eat a healthy diet rich in fruits and vegetables
  • Brush and floss your teeth daily

The mouth has long been recognized as a mirror reflecting the health of the body. With regular visits to your dentist and good oral health routines, you will have lots to smile about.

Links

References

  1. Canadian Cancer Statistics 2013. Toronto: Canadian Cancer Society.

Dr. Elizabeth Dimovski & Associates – We Protect Your Smile!

Brampton Dentists www.dentist-in-brampton.com

905-458-6620

Do You Have a Coating on Your Tongue Like Miley Cyrus?

Miley Cyrus, Coating on Tongue, Bad Breath, Tongue Scrapers, Brampton Dentists, Brampton Family Dentists,During sleep our body is busy cleaning toxins out of our body. Some of these toxins are deposited as a coating on our tongue. For people with a poor digestive system, during sleep, the tongue develops an even thicker coating causing bad breath. Although to fully reverse this problem one must look at their diet and digestive system, a great start is one that goes beyond just brushing alone. Investing in a good tongue scraper helps rid the coating and keep our breath fresh. Make tongue scraping part of your daily oral health routine for a cleaner fresher mouth. For more information be sure to visit your dentist!

Dr. Elizabeth Dimovski & Associates – We Protect Your Smile!!!!

905-458-6620

Do You Use a Tongue Scraper?

Best Dentist in Brampton, Bolton Dentists, Tongue Scrapers, Brampton Dentists, Brampton Dental Offices, Bad BreathA tongue scraper is a tool used to help clean your tongue. Although there’s no strong evidence that tongue scrapers are any more effective than regular brushing of the teeth and tongue, it may help curb bad breath. Tongue scrapers come in a variety of shapes and sizes, and work by starting at the back of the tongue and pulling the scraper forward. This removes any excess plaque and odor causing bacteria.

Possible causes of bad breath include diet, dry mouth, gum disease, tobacco use or simply bad oral hygiene. Good oral hygiene and regular dentist visits are essential to a healthy mouth.

Other tips for avoiding bad breath include:

  • Brushing your teeth for two minutes twice a day
  • Flossing once a day
  • Scheduling regular dental visits.

If you’re concerned about the cause of your bad breath, see your dentist.

Dr. Elizabeth Dimovski & Associates – We Protect Your Smile!

www.dentist-in-brampton.com

905-458-6620

Do you have Bad Breath?

What you eat affects your breath. If you don’t brush and floss daily, particles of food can remain in the mouth, collecting bacteria, which can cause bad breath.

Breath mints and chewing gum are great temporary solutions to bad breath, but they can’t help you if your bad breath problem stems from something beyond the garlic and onions you had for lunch. Persistent bad breath or a bad taste in the mouth can also be one of the warning signs of gum disease; which is caused by plaque.

Your first line of defence against bad breath should be to make sure you brush two times a day for two minutes and floss once a day. You should also brush your tongue since most of the bacteria in the mouth that are responsible for bad breath hang out on the back of the tongue. If you still find your breath is offensive, talk to your dentist or physician. Your dentist can work with you to develop a treatment plan that minimizes odor. This might include scraping the plaque off your tongue or using a special antibacterial mouth-rinse.

If you already practice good oral hygiene and still don’t know what’s causing your bad breath, make an appointment to see your dentist. Regular checkups allow your dentist to detect any problems such as gum disease or dry mouth. Bad breath may be the sign of a medical disorder. Some diseases have symptoms related to bad breath. Sinus or lung infections, bronchitis, diabetes, and some liver or kidney diseases may be associated with bad breath. If your dentist determines that your mouth is healthy, you may be referred to your primary care physician.

Maintaining good oral hygiene, eliminating gum disease and scheduling regular professional cleanings are essential to reducing bad breath. Brush twice a day and clean between your teeth daily with floss. Brush your tongue, too. If you wear dentures, be sure to remove them at night and clean them thoroughly before replacing them the next morning.

For more information be sure to schedule an appointment with one of our dental professionals.

Dr. Elizabeth Dimovski and Associates

905-458-6620

Bad Breath, Blog, Dental Health, Dental Information, Oral, Health,

Bad Breath